Week 4: Take a Break and Play!

We have covered a lot of ground over the last few weeks. This week is intended as a catch up week and to give you time to play with some of the tools you have been learning about.

By now you should be feeling comfortable with creating a post on your blog. Please take the time to look at some of your colleagues’ blogs and add comments. One of the best things about blogs is the ability to create community around topics and issues. Another fun thing to do is to create an online avatar which will be used on your blog and when you post on other’s blogs. You could also play with the look of your blog.

There are so many fun sites on the Web. Listed below are some fun things you can play with, if you have time.  The tools were selected, tested and compiled using two great sources of recommended Web 2.0 learning tools:

Larry Ferlazzo’s Websites of the Day

The American Library Association’s Top 25 Websites for Teaching and Learning

More tools to play with!

Zooburst for digital storytelling. Students create interactive pop-up books.

 Tagxedo – similar to Wordle, but with additional styling options.  Click the thumbnail to see a sample made in seconds, using the URL of this blog.

 

Educaplay – allows teachers to create multimedia teaching activities.

Photocollect – multiple users upload photos to a shared photo album.  Seems like a great way to gather all those different photos people take at an event!

Knovio – add video or audio to PowerPoint presentations and then share.

Remember, play is learning. We need to give ourselves permission to explore and try things. This is just one way to model being a lifelong learner to our students.

Week 3: Presentation Tools

When you’re looking for a great way to integrate web 2.0 technology into the learning experiences of teachers and students, these tools provide versatile, creative options to enhance presentations and to collaborate with a wide audience. This week, you can try out two excellent tools, VoiceThread and Jing. Choose 1 or try them both!

• VoiceThread


VoiceThread is a tool that allows people anywhere to join in an asynchronous, online multimedia conversation. It is an easy and fun way for teachers and students to create, collaborate, share, debate, and reflect on their learning.

The Basics:

Click on the picture below to see a quick overview of what a VoiceThread is and how it works and some examples of that people are doing with this great tool! 

 Click here for some great examples of using VoiceThread with students of all ages.

Your turn!  Get started on your tasks:

1. Sign up for a VoiceThread account
Once you register, you’ll be directed to the page shown below, where you will find simple steps for creating your first VoiceThread. Watch some of the videos or head straight to the Create tab to dive right in!

 

2. Create your first VoiceThread
3. Comment on it.
4. Share it with someone!
5. Blog about your experience

How are educators using VoiceThread?

Voicethread 4 Education is an extensive and informative source for examples of how teachers are using Voicethread.

Check out the Voicethread 4 Education’s Best Practices page for an excellent and thorough overview.

Teachers, particularly teachers of younger students, will appreciate this quick tutorial on how to make multiple identities, so that you can use one VoiceThread account for multiple users.  One class, one account.  Easy peasy.

Great tutorials:

Teacher training videos (another tutorial from Russell Stannard)

Extensive collection of video tutorials from beginner to advanced from tech integrationist and blogger, Jennifer Dorman.

Great tips and information from New Zealand educator Suzie Vesper

Even more information:

While VoiceThread is free tool, the people at VoiceThread also offer Ed.VoiceThread, a subscription based version designed specifically for K-12 educators.

Scholarly articles on the use of Voicethread in education

And now for…

Jing 

What is it?
Jing is a free online screensharing tool; it allows you to record a video of up to 5-minutes of anything you want to share that is on your computer screen. You can also use Jing to take still images of your desktop and to highlight, add text and annotate those images.

The Basics:

Jing is super easy to use!  Here’s the 1 minute quick tour.

Jing in the classroom:

Educators are discovering fun and effective ways to use Jing in the classroom. Find out more here:

Slideshow

• Check out this video.  Educator Russell Stannard loves Jing for language learners.

Your turn!  Get started on your tasks:

1. Explore the interactive tutorial from Techsmith, the creators of Jing.
(You will need to have Adobe Flash Player downloaded on your computer to be able to use the interactive tutorials.

Interactive tutorials:
Mac
Windows

If you don’t have Adobe Flash Player, try the tutorials below:

  • TechSmith provides over 20 training videos for beginning and advanced users of Jing!

2. Download the free version of Jing http://www.techsmith.com/download/jing/default.asp
3. Capture a screen image. Annotate it. Save it. OR create a Jing video.
4. Share your annotated image or video on your blog by sharing the link or embedding it.

Have fun!